About
Us

Mission Statement

To drive industry and academic leadership in fog computing & networking architecture, testbed development, and interoperability and composability deliverables that seamlessly bridge the cloud-to-things continuum.

Member Companies

Founding Members

 Cisco-logo white Dell-logo white Intel-logo white Microsoft-logo white Princeton-logo white

 

Contributing Members

GE-logo hitachi            

All Members

 

57 members and counting!

Staff

Lynne F. Canavan

Executive Director
781-401-0130
Lynne_Canavan@OpenFogConsortium.org

 

Debbie McGinnis

Account Manager
510-492-4070
dmcginnis@openfogconsortium.org

 

Jennifer Kupferman

Project Manager
510-492-4027
jenniferk@openfogconsortium.org

 

 

 

OpenFog Officers & Board of Directors

OpenFog Officers

Helder Antunes

Chairman

BIO

Jeff Fedders

President

BIO

Brent Hodges

Treasurer

BIO

Matt Vasey

VP Business Development

BIO

OpenFog Board Members

Mung Chiang

Board Member

BIO

Bill Curtis

Software Strategist for New Business Development

BIO

Rhonda Dirvin

Board Member

BIO

Dr. T. Russell Hsing

Board Member

BIO

Dr. Xiliang Luo

Board Member

BIO

Liam Quinn

Board Member

BIO

Marc-Thomas Schmidt

Board Member

BIO

Rong Shi

Board Member

BIO

Dennis F. Strigl

Board Member

BIO

Steve Vandris

Board Member

BIO

Dr. Yang Yang

Board Member

BIO

Makoto Yasuda

Board Member

BIO

Ron Zahavi

Board Member

BIO

Dr. Tao Zhang

Board Member

BIO

Jingyi Zhou

Board Member

BIO

Dr. Douglas N. Zuckerman

Board Member

BIO

Affiliations

Barcelona Supercomputing Center
Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) is the national supercomputing center in Spain. BSC specializes in high performance computing (HPC), and its mission is two-fold: to provide infrastructure and supercomputing services to European scientists, and to generate knowledge and technology to transfer to business and society. BSC is a Severo Ochoa Center of Excellence and a first level hosting member of the European research infrastructure PRACE (Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe). BSC also manages the Spanish Supercomputing Network (RES). BSC is a consortium that includes Spanish Government, Catalan Government and Technical University of Catalonia – Barcelona Tech.

IEEE
IEEE is a large global, technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology for the benefit of humanity. Through its highly cited publications, conferences, technology standards, and professional and educational activities, IEEE is the trusted voice on a wide variety of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics.

IoT Acceleration Consortium
The IoT Acceleration Consortium aims to combine the strengths of government, industry, and academia and build a structure for developing and demonstrating technologies related to the promotion of IoT as well as creating and facilitating new business models. The consortium promotes (1) the development, demonstration, and standardization for IoT-related technologies and (2) creation of various IoT-related project and recommendations such as regulatory reform necessary to run those projects.

Liaisons

OPC Foundation
Since 1996, the OPC Foundation has facilitated the development and adoption of the OPC information exchange standards. As both advocate and custodian of these specifications, the Foundation’s mission is to help industry vendors, end-users, and software developers maintain interoperability in their manufacturing and automation assets. The OPC Foundation is dedicated to providing the best specifications, technology, process and certification to achieve multivendor, multiplatform, secure, reliable interoperability for moving data and information from the embedded world to the enterprise cloud. The organization serves over 470 members worldwide in the Industrial Automation, IT, IoT, IIoT, M2M, Industrie 4.0, Building Automation, machine tools, pharmaceutical, petrochemical, and Smart Energy sectors.

 

Learn More

Frequently Asked Questions

Japanese Version

 

Why was the OpenFog Consortium formed? What problems are you hoping to solve?

What is Fog Computing?

What are the goals for the OpenFog Consortium?

Who are the founding members of the OpenFog Consortium?

Who else is involved in the OpenFog Consortium?

Is OpenFog a standards body? Is it a governing body?

How is OpenFog different from other IoT consortia and the other IoT-related standards groups that are being formed? Aren’t some of these already working to solve these issues?

What about collaboration with academia and research organizations?

What industries will benefit most from fog computing?

How is OpenFog organized and governed?

How is the work done?

What work has been done since OpenFog was launched in November 2015?

How do the members do the work?

What about the Regional Committees? How do they work?

Is an OpenFog architecture more complex and costly than the traditional cloud-centric models?

I already belong to other organizations. Why should my organization get involved with OpenFog?

How can my firm get involved? Can individuals get involved?

I have additional questions.  Who do I contact?

Governance Documents


The OpenFog Consortium (OpenFog) is a public-private ecosystem formed to accelerate the adoption of fog computing in order to solve the bandwidth, latency and communications challenges associated with the Internet of Things (IoT), Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, the Tactile Internet and other advanced concepts in the digitized world. It was founded by ARM, Cisco, Dell, Intel, Microsoft and Princeton University Edge Computing Laboratory in November 2015.

Our work is centered around creating a framework for efficient & reliable networks and intelligent endpoints combined with identifiable, secure, and privacy-friendly information flows between clouds, endpoints, and services based on open standard technologies. OpenFog members represent the leading thinkers and innovators in fog computing, who have come together to help build the foundational elements for this emerging area.

Among the challenges that we are collectively addressing are high latency on the network, support of end point mobility, loss of connectivity, unpredictable bandwidth bottlenecks and distributed coordination of systems and clients. Our technical workgroups are creating an OpenFog architecture that enables end-user clients or near-user edge devices to carry out computation, communication, control and storage.

The work of OpenFog is done through its Committees and Workgroups, overseen by a 15-person Board of Directors. OpenFog shares selected pre-publication work with industry associations through formal liaison and affiliation agreements. Its published work is posted under resources and is available for industry use.